Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Significant and Critical Accounting Policies and Practices (Policies)

v3.19.3
Significant and Critical Accounting Policies and Practices (Policies)
12 Months Ended
Aug. 31, 2019
Significant and Critical Accounting Policies and Practices  
Basis of Presentation

The accompanying financial statements and related notes have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”), and with the rules and regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) to Form 10-K and Article 8 of Regulation S-X. These financial statements should be read in conjunction with the notes herein.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), aimed at making leasing activities more transparent and comparable. Topic 842 requires substantially all leases, including leases currently classified as operating leases, to be recognized by lessees on their balance sheet as a right-of-use asset and corresponding lease liability. This update is effective for financial statements issued for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, with transition requiring lessees to recognize and measure leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this accounting standard on its financial statements and related disclosures.

Fiscal Year-End

The Company elected August 31st as its fiscal year ending date.

Use of Estimates and Assumptions and Critical Accounting Estimates and Assumptions

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date(s) of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period(s).

 

Critical accounting estimates are estimates for which (a) the nature of the estimate is material due to the levels of subjectivity and judgment necessary to account for highly uncertain matters or the susceptibility of such matters to change and (b) the impact of the estimate on financial condition or operating performance is material. The Company’s critical accounting estimates and assumptions affecting the financial statements were:

 

(i)

Assumption as a going concern: Management assumes that the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates continuity of operations, realization of assets, and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business.

 

(ii)

Fair value of long-lived assets: Fair value is generally determined using the asset’s expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. If long-lived assets are determined to be recoverable, but the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives are shorter than originally estimated, the net book values of the long-lived assets are depreciated over the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives. The Company considers the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) significant under-performance or losses of assets relative to expected historical or projected future operating results; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of assets or in the Company’s overall strategy with respect to the manner or use of the acquired assets or changes in the Company’s overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; (v) a significant decline in the Company’s stock price for a sustained period of time; and (vi) regulatory changes. The Company evaluates acquired assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.

 

(iii)

Valuation allowance for deferred tax assets: Management assumes that the realization of the Company’s net deferred tax assets resulting from its net operating loss (“NOL”) carry–forwards for Federal income tax purposes that may be offset against future taxable income was not considered more likely than not and accordingly, the potential tax benefits of the net loss carry-forwards are offset by a full valuation allowance. Management made this assumption based on (a) the Company has incurred recurring losses, (b) general economic conditions, and (c) its ability to raise additional funds to support its daily operations by way of a public or private offering, among other factors.

  

These significant accounting estimates or assumptions bear the risk of change due to the fact that there are uncertainties attached to these estimates or assumptions, and certain estimates or assumptions are difficult to measure or value.

 

Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.

 

Management regularly evaluates the key factors and assumptions used to develop the estimates utilizing currently available information, changes in facts and circumstances, historical experience and reasonable assumptions. After such evaluations, if deemed appropriate, those estimates are adjusted accordingly.

 

Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The Company follows paragraph 825-10-50-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for disclosures about fair value of its financial instruments and paragraph 820-10-35-37 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Paragraph 820-10-35-37”) to measure the fair value of its financial instruments. Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a framework for measuring fair value in generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. To increase consistency and comparability in fair value measurements and related disclosures, Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three (3) broad levels. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. The three (3) levels of fair value hierarchy defined by Paragraph 820-10-35-37 are described below:

 

Level 1

Quoted market prices available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date.

Level 2

Pricing inputs other than quoted prices in active markets included in Level 1, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reporting date.

Level 3

Pricing inputs that are generally unobservable inputs and not corroborated by market data.

 

Financial assets are considered Level 3 when their fair values are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques and at least one significant model assumption or input is unobservable.

 

The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. If the inputs used to measure the financial assets and liabilities fall within more than one level described above, the categorization is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement of the instrument.

 

The carrying amounts of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities, such as cash, accounts payable, accrued expenses, and payroll liabilities approximate their fair values because of the short maturity of these instruments. The long-term borrowings approximate fair value since the related rates of interest approximate current market rates.

  

Transactions involving related parties cannot be presumed to be carried out on an arm’s-length basis, as the requisite conditions of competitive, free-market dealings may not exist. Representations about transactions with related parties, if made, shall not imply that the related party transactions were consummated on terms equivalent to those that prevail in arm’s-length transactions unless such representations can be substantiated. 

 

Carrying Value, Recoverability and Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company has adopted Section 360-10-35 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for its long-lived assets. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 360-10-35-17 an impairment loss shall be recognized only if the carrying amount of a long-lived asset (asset group) is not recoverable and exceeds its fair value. The carrying amount of a long-lived asset (asset group) is not recoverable if it exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset (asset group). That assessment shall be based on the carrying amount of the asset (asset group) at the date it is tested for recoverability. An impairment loss shall be measured as the amount by which the carrying amount of a long-lived asset (asset group) exceeds its fair value. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 360-10-35-20 if an impairment loss is recognized, the adjusted carrying amount of a long-lived asset shall be its new cost basis. For a depreciable long-lived asset, the new cost basis shall be depreciated (amortized) over the remaining useful life of that asset. Restoration of a previously recognized impairment loss is prohibited.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 360-10-35-21 the Company’s long-lived asset (asset group) is tested for recoverability whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that its carrying amount may not be recoverable. The Company considers the following to be some examples of such events or changes in circumstances that may trigger an impairment review: (a) significant decrease in the market price of a long-lived asset (asset group); (b) A significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which a long-lived asset (asset group) is being used or in its physical condition; (c) A significant adverse change in legal factors or in the business climate that could affect the value of a long-lived asset (asset group), including an adverse action or assessment by a regulator; (d) An accumulation of costs significantly in excess of the amount originally expected for the acquisition or construction of a long-lived asset (asset group); (e) A current-period operating or cash flow loss combined with a history of operating or cash flow losses or a projection or forecast that demonstrates continuing losses associated with the use of a long-lived asset (asset group); and (f) A current expectation that, more likely than not, a long-lived asset (asset group) will be sold or otherwise disposed of significantly before the end of its previously estimated useful life. The Company tests its long-lived assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.

 

Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 360-10-45-4 and 360-10-45-5 an impairment loss recognized for a long-lived asset (asset group) to be held and used shall be included in income from continuing operations before income taxes in the income statement of a business entity. If a subtotal such as income from operations is presented, it shall include the amount of that loss. A gain or loss recognized on the sale of a long-lived asset (disposal group) that is not a component of an entity shall be included in income from continuing operations before income taxes in the income statement of a business entity. If a subtotal such as income from operations is presented, it shall include the amounts of those gains or losses.

Cash Equivalents

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents.

Computer Equipment

Computer equipment is recorded at cost. Expenditures for major additions and betterments are capitalized. Maintenance and repairs are charged to operations as incurred. Depreciation is computed by the straight-line method (after taking into account their respective estimated residual values) over the estimated useful lives of five (5) years.

 

Upon sale or retirement, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and any gain or loss is reflected in the statements of operations.

Patents

The Company follows the guidelines as set out in paragraph 350-30-25-3 and paragraph 350-30-35-6 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for patents. For acquired patents the Company records the costs to acquire patents as patents and amortizes the patent acquisition costs over their remaining legal lives, or estimated useful lives, or the term of the contracts, whichever is shorter. For internally developed patents, all costs incurred to the point when a patent application is to be filed are expended as incurred as research and development expense; patent application costs, generally legal costs, thereafter incurred are capitalized, which are to be amortized once the patents are granted or expensed if the patent application is rejected. The Company amortizes the internally developed patents over the shorter of the expected useful lives or the legal lives of the patents, which are generally 17 to 20 years for domestic patents and 5 to 20 years for foreign patents from the date when the patents are granted. The costs of defending and maintaining patents are expended as incurred.

  

Upon becoming fully amortized, the related cost and accumulated amortization are removed from the accounts.

Related Parties

The Company follows subtopic 850-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for the identification of related parties and disclosure of related party transactions.

 

Pursuant to Section 850-10-20 the related parties include a. affiliates (“Affiliate” means, with respect to any specified Person, any other Person that, directly or indirectly through one or more intermediaries, controls, is controlled by or is under common control with such Person, as such terms are used in and construed under Rule 405 under the Securities Act) of the Company; b. entities for which investments in their equity securities would be required, absent the election of the fair value option under the Fair Value Option Subsection of Section 825–10–15, to be accounted for by the equity method by the investing entity; c. trusts for the benefit of employees, such as pension and profit-sharing trusts that are managed by or under the trusteeship of management; d. principal owners of the Company; e. management of the Company; f. other parties with which the Company may deal if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests; and g. other parties that can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the transacting parties or that have an ownership interest in one of the transacting parties and can significantly influence the other to an extent that one or more of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests.

 

The financial statements shall include disclosures of material related party transactions, other than compensation arrangements, expense allowances, and other similar items in the ordinary course of business. However, disclosure of transactions that are eliminated in the preparation of consolidated or combined financial statements is not required in those statements. The disclosures shall include: a. the nature of the relationship(s) involved; b. a description of the transactions, including transactions to which no amounts or nominal amounts were ascribed, for each of the periods for which income statements are presented, and such other information deemed necessary to an understanding of the effects of the transactions on the financial statements; c. the dollar amounts of transactions for each of the periods for which income statements are presented and the effects of any change in the method of establishing the terms from that used in the preceding period; and d. amounts due from or to related parties as of the date of each balance sheet presented and, if not otherwise apparent, the terms and manner of settlement.

Commitment and Contingencies

The Company follows subtopic 450-20 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report accounting for contingencies. Certain conditions may exist as of the date the financial statements are issued, which may result in a loss to the Company but which will only be resolved when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. The Company assesses such contingent liabilities, and such assessment inherently involves an exercise of judgment. In assessing loss contingencies related to legal proceedings that are pending against the Company or unasserted claims that may result in such proceedings, the Company evaluates the perceived merits of any legal proceedings or unasserted claims as well as the perceived merits of the amount of relief sought or expected to be sought therein.

 

If the assessment of a contingency indicates that it is probable that a material loss has been incurred and the amount of the liability can be estimated, then the estimated liability would be accrued in the Company’s financial statements. If the assessment indicates that a potential material loss contingency is not probable but is reasonably possible, or is probable but cannot be estimated, then the nature of the contingent liability, and an estimate of the range of possible losses, if determinable and material, would be disclosed.

 

Loss contingencies considered remote are generally not disclosed unless they involve guarantees, in which case the guarantees would be disclosed.

Revenue Recognition

In May 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which outlines a single, comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes most current revenue recognition guidance. The accounting standard was originally effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016. ASU No. 2015-14 simply defers the effective date of ASU No. 2014-09 to reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted for reporting periods after December 15, 2016. Prior period amounts have not been adjusted and continue to be reported in accordance with the Company’s historic accounting under ASC 605, Revenue Recognition. The adoption had no material impact on the Company’s financial statements and there were no adjustments to revenue as a result of the adoption.

  

Under ASC 606, revenue is recognized when control of the promised goods and services is transferred to the Company’s customers, in an amount that reflects the consideration that the Company expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods and services, net of value-added tax. The Company determines revenue recognition through the following steps:

 

 

·

Identify the contract with a customer;

 

 

·

Identify the performance obligations in the contract;

 

 

·

Determine the transaction price;

 

 

·

Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and

 

 

·

Recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation.

 

Research and Development

The Company follows paragraph 730-10-25-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (formerly Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 2 “Accounting for Research and Development Costs”) and paragraph 730-20-25-11 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (formerly Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 68 “Research and Development Arrangements”) for research and development costs. Research and development costs are charged to expense as incurred. Research and development costs consist primarily of remuneration for material and testing costs for research and development.

Deferred Tax Assets and Income Tax Provision

The Company accounts for income taxes under Section 740-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based upon differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the statements of operations in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company adopted section 740-10-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Section 740-10-25”). Section 740-10-25 addresses the determination of whether tax benefits claimed or expected to be claimed on a tax return should be recorded in the financial statements. Under Section 740-10-25, the Company may recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent (50%) likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Section 740-10-25 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties on income taxes, accounting in interim periods and requires increased disclosures.

 

The estimated future tax effects of temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities are reported in the accompanying balance sheets, as well as tax credit carry-backs and carry-forwards. The Company periodically reviews the recoverability of deferred tax assets recorded on its balance sheets and provides valuation allowances as management deems necessary.

 

Management makes judgments as to the interpretation of the tax laws that might be challenged upon an audit and cause changes to previous estimates of tax liability. In addition, the Company operates within multiple taxing jurisdictions and is subject to audit in these jurisdictions. In management’s opinion, adequate provisions for income taxes have been made for all years. If actual taxable income by tax jurisdiction varies from estimates, additional allowances or reversals of reserves may be necessary.

 

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. government enacted comprehensive tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”). The Tax Act makes broad and complex changes to the U.S. tax code, including, but not limited to, (1) reducing the U.S. federal corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent; (2) requiring companies to pay a one-time transition tax on certain unrepatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries; (3) generally eliminating U.S. federal income taxes on dividends from foreign subsidiaries; (4) requiring a current inclusion in U.S. federal taxable income of certain earnings of controlled foreign corporations; (5) eliminating the corporate alternative minimum tax (“AMT”) and changing how existing AMT credits can be realized; (6) creating a base erosion anti-abuse tax, a new minimum tax; (7) creating a new limitation on deductible interest expense; and (8) changing rules related to uses and limitations of net operating loss carryforwards created in tax years beginning after December 31, 2017.

 

The Act reduces the corporate tax rate to 21 percent, effective January 1, 2018. 

Reclassification

Certain amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s presentation.

Earnings per Share

Earnings per share (“EPS”) are the amount of earnings attributable to each share of common stock. For convenience, the term is used to refer to either earnings or loss per share. EPS is computed pursuant to section 260-10-45 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 260-10-45-10 through 260-10-45-16, basic EPS shall be computed by dividing income available to common stockholders (the numerator) by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding (the denominator) during the period. Income available to common stockholders shall be computed by deducting both the dividends declared in the period on preferred stock (whether or not paid) and the dividends accumulated for the period on cumulative preferred stock (whether or not earned) from income from continuing operations (if that amount appears in the income statement) and also from net income. The computation of diluted EPS is similar to the computation of basic EPS except that the denominator is increased to include the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if the dilutive potential common shares had been issued during the period to reflect the potential dilution that could occur from common shares issuable through contingent shares issuance arrangement, stock options or warrants.

  

Pursuant to ASC Paragraphs 260-10-45-45-21 through 260-10-45-45-23 Diluted EPS shall be based on the most advantageous conversion rate or exercise price from the standpoint of the security holder. The dilutive effect of outstanding call options and warrants (and their equivalents) issued by the reporting entity shall be reflected in diluted EPS by application of the treasury stock method unless the provisions of paragraphs 260-10-45-35 through 45-36 and 260-10-55-8 through 55-11 require that another method be applied. Equivalents of options and warrants include non-vested stock granted to employees, stock purchase contracts, and partially paid stock subscriptions (see paragraph 260–10–55–23). Anti-dilutive contracts, such as purchased put options and purchased call options, shall be excluded from diluted EPS. Under the treasury stock method: a. Exercise of options and warrants shall be assumed at the beginning of the period (or at time of issuance, if later) and common shares shall be assumed to be issued. b. The proceeds from exercise shall be assumed to be used to purchase common stock at the average market price during the period. (See paragraphs 260-10-45-29 and 260-10-55-4 through 55-5.) c. The incremental shares (the difference between the number of shares assumed issued and the number of shares assumed purchased) shall be included in the denominator of the diluted EPS computation.

 

There were no dilutive common shares for the years ended August 31, 2019 and 2018. The convertible notes payable were excluded from the EPS calculation as they would have been anti-dilutive. As of August 31, 2019, the aggregate shares excluded from the EPS calculation, as they would have been anti-dilutive, was 1.1 million shares.

 

Cash Flows Reporting

The Company adopted paragraph 230-10-45-24 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for cash flows reporting, classifies cash receipts and payments according to whether they stem from operating, investing, or financing activities and provides definitions of each category, and uses the indirect or reconciliation method (“Indirect method”) as defined by paragraph 230-10-45-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report net cash flow from operating activities by adjusting net income to reconcile it to net cash flow from operating activities by removing the effects of (a) all deferrals of past operating cash receipts and payments and all accruals of expected future operating cash receipts and payments and (b) all items that are included in net income that do not affect operating cash receipts and payments. The Company reports the reporting currency equivalent of foreign currency cash flows, using the current exchange rate at the time of the cash flows and the effect of exchange rate changes on cash held in foreign currencies is reported as a separate item in the reconciliation of beginning and ending balances of cash and cash equivalents and separately provides information about investing and financing activities not resulting in cash receipts or payments in the period pursuant to paragraph 830-230-45-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification.

Stock-Based Payments

The Company recognizes all employee stock-based payments as a cost in the financial statements. Equity classified awards are measured at the grant date fair value of the award. The Company estimates grant date fair value for stock options using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model.

 

No warrants were issued or outstanding for the years ended August 31, 2019 and 2018.

Derivative Liabilities

The Company evaluates its financial instruments and other contracts to determine if those contracts or embedded components of those contracts qualify as derivatives to be separately accounted for in accordance with ASC 815. The result of this accounting treatment is that the fair value of the embedded derivative is marked- to-market at each balance sheet date and recorded as a liability and the change in fair value is recorded in the statements of operations as other income or expense. Upon conversion or exercise of a derivative instrument, the instrument is marked to fair value at the conversion date and then that fair value is reclassified to equity.

 

The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is re-assessed at the end of each reporting period. Derivative instruments that become subject to reclassification are reclassified at the fair value of the instrument on the reclassification date. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not settlement of the derivative instrument is expected within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

 

From time to time, certain of the Company’s embedded conversion features on debt and outstanding warrants are treated as derivative liabilities for accounting purposes under ASC 815 due to insufficient authorized shares to fully settle conversion features of the instruments if exercised. These contracts were recognized at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in earnings until such time as the conditions giving rise to such derivative liability classification were settled.

 

These derivative instruments did not trade in an active securities market. The Company used Black Scholes option pricing model to value derivative liabilities. This model used Level 3 inputs in the fair value hierarchy established by ASC 820 Fair Value Measurement.